Example of Workplace Violence Policy

Prepared by:

CENTER FOR HUMAN RELIABILITY STUDIES

Environmental and Health Sciences Division

P.O. Box 117, MS 50

Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117

Phone +1 423 576 2208

Fax +1 423 576 7903

Policy XXX.X

DATE

SUBJECT: PREVENTING ACTS OF AGGRESSION, THREATENING BEHAVIOR, AND VIOLENCE IN THE WORKPLACE

BACKGROUND

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recognizes workplace violence as a serious occupational problem. In a June 1996 report, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) published data that revealed homicide has become the second leading overall cause of occupational injury and death, exceeded only by motor-vehicle-related deaths. This report also identified homicide as the leading cause of occupational injury and death for female workers. The Northwestern National Life notes the seriousness of workplace violence in their 1993 report, which states that of every four full-time workers, one is harassed, threatened, or attacked on the job each year. Many incidents can be avoided by employees who are able to recognize early warning signs of potential violence, know when and how to report concerns, and know how to implement the steps to defuse situations before they become violent.

PURPOSE AND SCOPE

The purpose of this policy is to provide a safe workplace free from aggressive, threatening, or violent acts through the development and implementation of an effective program that provides a safe workplace. The provisions of this Policy apply to all work sites owned or controlled by (your company) and at which work is performed for (your company).

POLICY

It is the policy of (your company) to provide a safe workplace for its employees. To this end, all elements of (your company) are expected to implement a program to prevent and respond to violence in the workplace. For purposes of this policy, violence is defined as the deliberate and wrongful violation, damage, or abuse of other persons, self, or property and includes threats of violence. Acts of violence and threats thereof include, but may not be limited to: verbal (such as threats, harassment, abuse, and intimidation), non-verbal (such as gestures and intimidation), physical (such as hitting, pushing, shoving, kicking, touching, and assault), and other (such as arson, sabotage, vandalism, and stalking). It is important that all threats be taken seriously.

In developing this program, all sites shall consider the following:

  1. A site-specific workplace violence policy and plan that includes written objectives and requirements for all bureau of Labor Statistics, Census of Fatal Occupational injuries, U.S. Department of Labor, 1994.

Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970.

29 U.S., C.S. 654 (a) (2), 1994.